This Week in Books

This Week in Books – 30-03-22

This Week in Books is a feature hosted by Lipsy at Lipsyy Lost and Found that allows bloggers to share:

  • What they’ve recently finished reading
  • What they are currently reading
  • What they are planning to read next

A similar meme is run by Taking on a World of Words.


The last book I finished reading was Room by Emma Donoghue. It’s absolutely superb, although how I’m going to write a review for it, I’ve no idea!

Scared is what you’re feeling. Brave is what you’re doing.

It’s Jack’s birthday, and he’s excited about turning five.

Jack lives with his Ma in Room, which has a locked door and a skylight, and measures 11 feet by 11 feet. He loves watching TV, and the cartoon characters he calls friends, but he knows that nothing he sees on screen is truly real – only him, Ma and the things in Room. Until the day Ma admits that there’s a world outside . . .

Told in Jack’s voice, Room is the story of a mother and son whose love lets them survive the impossible. Unsentimental and sometimes funny, devastating yet uplifting, Room by Emma Donoghue is a novel like no other.


My current read is The Gallows Pole by Benjamin Myers.

From his remote moorland home, David Hartley assembles a gang of weavers and land-workers to embark upon a criminal enterprise that will capsize the economy and become the biggest fraud in British history.

They are the Cragg Vale Coiners and their business is ‘clipping’ – the forging of coins, a treasonous offence punishable by death. When an excise officer vows to bring them down and with the industrial age set to change the face of England forever, Hartley’s empire begins to crumble.

Forensically assembled, The Gallows Pole is a true story of resistance and a rarely told alternative history of the North.


I’m not sure what I’ll read next. Maybe The Fell by Sarah Moss. Random fact – I’ve walked up the hill shown on the cover, which is called Back Tor.

At dusk on a November evening in 2020 a woman slips out of her garden gate and turns up the hill. Kate is in the middle of a two-week quarantine period, but she just can’t take it any more – the closeness of the air in her small house, the confinement. And anyway, the moor will be deserted at this time. Nobody need ever know.

But Kate’s neighbour Alice sees her leaving and Matt, Kate’s son, soon realizes she’s missing. And Kate, who planned only a quick solitary walk – a breath of open air – falls and badly injures herself. What began as a furtive walk has turned into a mountain rescue operation . . .

Unbearably suspenseful, witty and wise, The Fell asks probing questions about the place the world has become since March 2020, and the place it was before. This novel is a story about compassion and kindness and what we must do to survive, and it will move you to tears.


And that’s my week in books! What are you reading this week? Let me know in the comments! 😎

4 comments

    1. Absolutely. I found it surprisingly engaging given that it’s told from the perspective on someone so young, and I think that in doing so she shields the reader from the worst of the detail. It’s really well done.

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